Jeffrey Ullman on the National Benefit

Once a year, NICTA’s external advisory boards, called ISAG/IBAG (International {Scientific, Business} Advisory Group), hold a meeting. There are some well known people on this panel, including Jeffrey D. Ullman, who is one of, if not the, most cited computer scientists. At the most recent ISAG/IBAG, the NICTA executive sought some advice on the potential Read more about Jeffrey Ullman on the National Benefit[…]

Thanks for your help

To those who responded to my plea for help by leaving a comment or responding out-of-band, thank you very much. We’ve settled on a name for our application, purchased the corresponding domain names and filed a trade mark application. Will keep you posted as things evolve further. But just to give you an idea, we’ve Read more about Thanks for your help[…]

I need your help

Valued readers, would you be so kind as to lend 15 seconds of your time completing the following task for me, your humble host. I ask that, from among the five names below (which, for various reasons, all begin with the word “cite”), you choose the one name that you believe sounds the best. The Read more about I need your help[…]

NICTA Queensland gets more funding

In another piece of NICTA news, on Thursday Queensland Premier Anna Bligh announced that the state government will invest $10.05 million in NICTA’s Queensland Research Laboratory over the next four years. Here’s an interesting tidbit from the Australian IT news article: Technologies developed by NICTA’s Queensland facility are widely used by the state government. One Read more about NICTA Queensland gets more funding[…]

Startup: an explanation

It’s probably time to come clean about my recent spate of posts on startups, Ruby, Python and so on. Well, there are a few things about peer review and publishing in the realm of academia that I think could be better, so I tried to figure out an alternative process that retains the benefits and Read more about Startup: an explanation[…]

Finding a human need

I’ve been reading over old ubicomp papers in preparation for a new project at NICTA. So it was that I found myself reading “Charting Past, Present, and Future Research in Ubiquitous Computing“, by Gregory Abowd and Elizabeth Mynatt (whom, incidentally, should surely be listed among those ubiquitous computing researchers who inspire me – particularly Abowd, Read more about Finding a human need[…]

Meeting of the minds

Enough politics. Back to a more wholesome topic… Here’s a photo of a dinner we held for Anind Dey at the Brasserie on the River a couple of weeks ago. The photo contains two of my previously mentioned ubiquitous computing inspirators. Clockwise from the top right we have Jaga Indulska, Anind Dey, Karen Henricksen (Robinson), Read more about Meeting of the minds[…]

Uncalculated threat: the stay-at-home generation

The excellent Paul Graham observes that the cost of getting a web startup off the ground is very low, and getting lower. Hence the proliferation of so-called Web 2.0 companies. He, like me, believes there’s still a lot of room for more web startups. Facebook, YouTube and company are only the beginning. Innovative minds will Read more about Uncalculated threat: the stay-at-home generation[…]