Citemine: a new way to do peer review and publishing

As you probably know, I’m a ubicomp researcher by day. However, on the side, NICTA‘s allowed me to allocate some of my time to develop a new way for researchers to review and publish papers. We’ve deployed a very early proof-of-concept of our idea called Citemine. We think Citemine has several nice properties, including a Read more about Citemine: a new way to do peer review and publishing[…]

Thanks for your help

To those who responded to my plea for help by leaving a comment or responding out-of-band, thank you very much. We’ve settled on a name for our application, purchased the corresponding domain names and filed a trade mark application. Will keep you posted as things evolve further. But just to give you an idea, we’ve Read more about Thanks for your help[…]

I need your help

Valued readers, would you be so kind as to lend 15 seconds of your time completing the following task for me, your humble host. I ask that, from among the five names below (which, for various reasons, all begin with the word “cite”), you choose the one name that you believe sounds the best. The Read more about I need your help[…]

Ben on ubicomp: spot on

True: Often we seem to use the term Ubiquitous Computing to mean “computers everywhere” as if just having the hardware all over the place was a worthwhile end in itself. But maybe a better meaning is “computing available when you want it in a way that makes sense for where you are and what you’re Read more about Ben on ubicomp: spot on[…]

Augmented reality on your mobile: the next big thing?

It’s been a while in the making, but augmented reality on your mobile is just about here. And by that, I mean that these applications are available for your mobile phone, and it will only be a matter of time before they gain critical mass. So what am I talking about? In the research space, Read more about Augmented reality on your mobile: the next big thing?[…]

Startup: an explanation

It’s probably time to come clean about my recent spate of posts on startups, Ruby, Python and so on. Well, there are a few things about peer review and publishing in the realm of academia that I think could be better, so I tried to figure out an alternative process that retains the benefits and Read more about Startup: an explanation[…]

Rediscovering closures and nested functions

When you’ve spent years coding pretty much everything in Java, it’s hard to break out of the Java way of doing things. It means that you tend to forget that other languages might have things called closures, for example. Here’s how a closure looks in Python: lambda x:dosomethingto(x,anothervariable) The neat thing is that this closure Read more about Rediscovering closures and nested functions[…]

Another tangible user interface

The GroupLab at the University of Calgary has published a technical report describing Souvenirs, a tangible user interface for sharing digital photos in the home environment. It is very similar in spirit to Bowl, which I’ve previously blogged. Souvenirs will be formally published in the Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems. Read more about Another tangible user interface[…]

Finding a human need

I’ve been reading over old ubicomp papers in preparation for a new project at NICTA. So it was that I found myself reading “Charting Past, Present, and Future Research in Ubiquitous Computing“, by Gregory Abowd and Elizabeth Mynatt (whom, incidentally, should surely be listed among those ubiquitous computing researchers who inspire me – particularly Abowd, Read more about Finding a human need[…]